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Common Questions

How can therapy help me?                                                                                                                                                                                                              
 
Therapists can provide support, problem-solving skills, and enhanced coping strategies for issues such as depression, anxiety, relationship difficulties, unresolved childhood issues, grief, and stress management. Many people also find that counselors can be a tremendous asset to managing interpersonal relationships, family concerns, marriage issues, and the stresses of daily life. Therapists can provide a fresh perspective on a difficult problem or point you in the direction of a solution. The benefits you obtain from therapy depend on how well you use the process and put into practice what you learn. 

What is a Marriage and Family Therapist?

A Marriage and Family Therapist has specialized training in psychotherapy and family systems. A Marriage and Family Therapist takes a wider and perhaps more holistic view of you as you are in the context of your relationships. A Marriage and Family Therapist is able to evaluate, diagnose, treat and help prevent cognitive, emotional, and behavioral dysfuntions. Your Marriage and Family Therapist has a graduate degree, extensive supervised clinical training after the degree, passed an examination on the theory and practice of Marriage and Family Therapy, is licensed to practice in the state of Florida, and has many years of success and experience counseling. 

What is different about a Marriage and Family Therapist?

"Research indicates that marriage and family therapy is as effective, and in some cases more effective than standard and/or individual treatments for many mental health problems such as: adult schizophrenia, affective (mood) disorders, adult alcoholism and drug abuse, children's conduct disorders, adolescent drug abuse, anorexia in young adult women, childhood autism, chronic physical illness in adults and children, and marital distress and conflict."   AAMFT 
 

Do I really need therapy?  I can usually handle my problems.  
  
Everyone goes through challenging situations in life, and while you may have successfully navigated through other difficulties you've faced, there's nothing wrong with seeking out extra support when you need it. There is wisdom in seeking the asssistance of those whose expertise can benefit you.  You are taking responsibility by recognizing your situation and making a commitment to change it by seeking therapy. Therapy can provide long-lasting benefits and support, giving you the tools you need to avoid triggers, re-direct damaging patterns, and  find options for the challenges you and your family face. 


Why do people go to therapy and how do I know if it is right for me?

People have many different motivations for coming to psychotherapy.  You may be going through a major life transition (birth of a child, new marriage, unemployment, divorce, new job, etc.), or are not handling stressful circumstances as well as you would like. Some people need assistance managing a range of other issues such as depression, anxiety, addictions, relationship problems, or spiritual conflicts. Most of us have what I can "uneven development" meaning we might have excelled in some areas (perhaps physical or intellectual) and not be as balanced as we would like in another area (spiritual, emotional, or relationship). Therapy can help provide some much needed encouragement and help with solutions not only get you through growth periods but enhance your life. 
 
  
What about medication vs. psychotherapy?  
 
It is well established that the long-term solution to emotional problems and relationship issues cannot be solved solely by medication. Instead of just treating the symptom, therapy addresses the cause of our distress and the behavior patterns that curb our progress. You can best achieve sustainable growth and a greater sense of well-being with an integrative approach to wellness.  Working with your medical doctor you can determine what's best for you, and in some cases a combination of medication and therapy is the right course of action. 
 
 
Do you take insurance, and how does that work?
 
Our office is happy to file your insurance. To determine if you have mental health coverage through your insurance carrier, the first thing you can do is call them.  
 
Does what we talk about in therapy remain confidential?
 
Confidentiality is one of the most important components between a client and psychotherapist. Successful therapy requires a high degree of trust with highly sensitive subject matter that is usually not discussed anywhere but the therapist's office.   You can expect that what you discuss in session will not be shared with anyone.  Sometimes, however, you may want your therapist to share information or give an update to someone on your healthcare team (like your Physician or Attorney), but by law your therapist cannot release this information without obtaining your written permission.
 
State law and professional ethics require therapists to maintain confidentiality except when there is suspected abuse or neglect of children or others who cannot protect themselves, and in cases where a client is in serious danger of harming her/himself or another person.









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